Inspirations

  • HBO Max hits 28.7M subscribers in Q3, but few are over-the-top

    AT&T painted a rosy picture of HBO Max adoption during the company’s earnings report on Thursday. Despite not being available on Roku, one of the top streaming platforms in the U.S., AT&T said new HBO Max activations more than doubled from second-quarter levels, reaching 8.6 million in Q3. In total, 28.7 million customers were eligible to stream their HBO Max subscription by the end of the quarter, the company said. Of these, 25.1 million came from “wholesale” agreements — meaning a pay TV provider of some kind, like Comcast, Charter, Verizon [TechCrunch’s parent], or AT&T’s own DirecTV, for example. But only 3.625 million were direct “retail” subscribers. Combined, both HBO and HBO Max topped 38 million subscribers in the U.S. and 57 million worldwide. The 38 million figure put the company ahead of its previously announced year-end target of 36 million, the report said. However, AT&T’s numbers alone don’t ...

  • Uber drivers sue company alleging coercive Prop 22 advertising

    Uber is facing a class-action lawsuit over Proposition 22 that alleges the company is illegally coercing its drivers to support the ballot measure that seeks to keep workers classified as independent contractors. The suit was brought forth by two Uber drivers, Benjamin Valdez and Hector Castellanos, as well as two California nonprofit organizations, Worksafe and Chinese Progressive Association. “Let’s be absolutely clear,” David Lowe, an attorney for the plaintiffs, said in a statement. “Uber’s threats and constant barrage of Prop 22 propaganda on an app the drivers must use to do their work have one purpose: to coerce the drivers to support Uber’s political battle to strip them of workplace protections.” In the suit, provided by The New York Times reporter Kate Conger, the plaintiffs argue Uber has encouraged its drivers and delivery workers to support Prop 22 via the company’s driver-scheduling app. “Uber’s solicitations have the purpos...

  • 3 reforms social media platforms should make in light of ‘The Social Dilemma’

    Jason Morgese Contributor Jason Morgese is the founder and CEO of Leavemark, the first ad-free, data storage and social media hybrid. “The Social Dilemma” is opening eyes and changing digital lives for Netflix bingers across the globe. The filmmakers explore social media and its effects on society, raising some crucial points about impacts on mental health, politics and the myriad ways firms leverage user data. It interweaves interviews from industry executives and developers who discuss how social sites can manipulate human psychology to drive deeper engagement and time spent within the platforms. Despite the glaring issues present with social media platforms, people still crave digital attention, especially during a pandemic, where in-person connections are strained if not impossible. So, how can the industry change for the better? Here are three ways social media should adapt to create happier and healthier interpersonal connections...

  • Netflix launches a virtual HBCU boot camp with Norfolk State to increase exposure to the tech industry

    Netflix is going back to school. Working with Norfolk State University, the alma mater of one of the company’s senior software engineers, and the online education platform, 2U, Netflix is developing a virtual boot camp for students to gain exposure to the tech industry. Starting today Netflix will open enrollment for 130 students to participate in a 16-week training program beginning in January. That program will be divided into three tracks — Java Engineering, UX/UI Design and Data Science. Experts from Netflix will work with 2U to design each track and all courses will be led by faculty from Norfolk State University and feature guest lecturers from the tech industry, the company said. Members from the company’s data science, engineering and design teams will serve as mentors — including Norfolk State alumnus Michael Chase. Netflix will foot the bill for students accepted into the program, and they’ll get course credit for completing the boot camp, the c...

  • Announcing the Agenda for TC Sessions: Space 2020

    TC Sessions: Space is happening this December 16 and 17 – our first ever dedicated space event. This is a live, virtual two-day conference featuring the most important people in the space industry, across public, private and defense. We’re thrilled to be hosting NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, Rocket Lab CEO and founder Peter Beck, U.S. Space Force Chief of Space Operations General Jay Raymond, Lockheed Martin VP and head of civil space programs Lisa Callahan and many more. In addition to the firesides and panel discussions of the virtual stage, the event will also include networking, startup presentations, and the chance to connect with attendees from around the world. Below, you’ll find the official agenda for TC Sessions: Space. It’s a packed two days already, but we’ve got some extra surprises in store, so keep an eye on the agenda over the coming weeks for more great speakers and sessions we’re adding. If you want to be a part of this event, you...